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Teaching Character and "Grit"--The New Pedagogical Challenge

Sure, we all know kids are capable of learning multiplication, grammar, and scientific theory, but what about character? What about "grit?" Anyone will tell you that character development is a major part of growing up and becoming a successful human, but can teaching character really be part of the curriculum?
A Collection By Jen Jeffers
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Teaching Character and "Grit"--The New Pedagogical Challenge
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Teaching Grit: How to Help Students Overcome Inner Obstacles

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Grit is not just a hot topic right now in education, it's also a real goal for some teachers. Adolescents need to find ways to work with their emotions, build resilience, and deepen self-awareness, all of which can be accessed through this character trait. There are embedded links here with goals, lesson plans, student handouts, and videos--lots of resources to get educators thinking about this intriguing pedagogical challenge.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    Teaching Character: The Choices We Make

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Character is not always about doing the right thing. We all fall short of others' expectations at some point, so character is particularly important because it is how we react when thing are difficult--that is when it is truly revealed. This piece discusses this at length and offers effective classroom activities to works on this important area in a student's life.
  • prospect.org
    prospect.org

    Teaching Character

    7 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Here you will find some intriguing information on how "character classes" were conducted at a charter school in New York City, including results and specific strategies. "Grit" has become a buzzword in education and the debate is heated around the feasibility of this academic goal.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    Aligned with the same ability and opportunity, why do some children fail while others succeed? This best-selling book argues that the qualities which matter most have to do with skills like curiosity, perseverance, optimism, and impulse control, not just academic ability. The author reveals within how this new knowledge can transform the learning and lives of young people.
  • newrepublic.com
    newrepublic.com

    Teaching Kids 'Grit' is All the Rage. Here's What's Wrong With It.

    7 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Paying attention the way students develop character over time is defined by a trend called "new character education." You will find some fascinating discussion on this method which includes seven main character strengths: grit, zest, self-control, optimism, gratitude, social intelligence, and curiosity. But teaching character and other related traits is not a clear science and the fear of whether we may lose academia in the process is ever present.
  • theatlantic.com
    theatlantic.com

    The Benefits of Character Education

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    Higher academic performance is reported in schools where character teaching is addressed. Not only does this refer to testing, but also improved attendance, reduced violence, and less vandalism. In our pursuit of meeting assessment needs and "performing" at certain levels, have we compromised the goal of being a good person? A happy person? A compassionate person?
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    Teaching Character Traits in Reader's Workshop

    5 minute read
    Jen Jeffers says:
    The first step in teaching character is to define it for your students. What is character and why is it important? Analyzing how the notion of character functions within reading is an excellent platform for this discussion. Students are able to make larger connections about character through witnessing their actions within the storyline.
  • Jen Jeffers says:
    Some people say that no matter whether you are trying or not, as a an adult who works closely with young people, you are always teaching character in some capacity whether it's through your words, your actions, or the values you convey. This article shows how you can create meaningful character building exercises across the curriculum. Choose your grade level and then peruse the wonderful questions and discuss prompts you can use with your students.
Brenda BradfordHigh School Math Health The Arts Non-Departmental
Brenda Asks:My main question is how do I incorporate teaching character and grit in a core content class (e.g. English, math, science)?