Closing a Learning Project

Guiding the reviews and evaluations of project and student outcomes in a completed learning project
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About this Micro-credential

Key Method

Facilitating the creation and use of evaluation criteria for students to review project results, the learning outcomes, and the effectiveness of the project managing methods used – and helping students present, celebrate, and reflect on the lessons learned

Method Components

Note: Though this micro-credential focuses on one phase of a learning project, it is best to have students complete a whole project and focus on the competencies involved in this particular phase of the project cycle in preparing your submission.

Guiding the creation and use of a series of evaluation criteria to review the quality and impact of project results, the individual and team learning outcomes, and the effectiveness of the project methods used; helping students present and celebrate the work accomplished in the project; and providing guidance for students to reflect on the lessons learned so that the next project can be even better; to comprehensively evaluate and consolidate student learning in bringing the project to a close.

Closing a Learning Project elements:

Suggested Preparation

Student project teams can brainstorm, discuss, and list what criteria they think are the most important to evaluate the project work, organizing them into categories that make sense; they can then share and compare their results.

Introducing the Closing (Reviewing) Project Phase

(to see the graphic associated with the full project cycle, please download the full micro-credential.)

Introducing, showing examples, and discussing three types of project reviews and two kinds of closing activities students can use to summarize and celebrate their learning can be helpful:

  • Evaluating Project Results: creating criteria and evaluating the quality and impact of the project results
  • Evaluating Project Learning: creating criteria and evaluating the individual and team learning outcomes
  • Evaluating Project Methods: creating criteria and evaluating the effectiveness of the project managing methods
  • Presenting & Celebrating: presenting the project results and process to an audience and celebrating the project work
  • Project Reflections: recording the lessons learned and ways to improve the next project

Evaluating Project Results

Students can create a list of criteria (or rubrics) to evaluate the quality and impact of their project results, based on such questions as:

  • What was the quality of the project research? (depth, breadth, quality of sources, etc.)
  • What was the quality of the craftsmanship of the results produced? (writing quality, construction quality, presentation quality, etc.)
  • What was the impact of the produced results on the team members? (motivation, understanding, problem-solving, presentation skills, etc.)
  • What was the impact of the produced results on the intended audience? (engagement, persuasion, action, etc.)
  • Did the project produce an effective answer to a question, solution to a problem, position on an issue, or performance that communicated a clear perspective?
  • If the project could be done again, what would be done differently to improve it?


Each person on the team can provide their own answers to these questions and ratings for the evaluating criteria, and the responses can then be shared and discussed among the team members.

Evaluating Project Learning

Students can create a list of criteria (or rubrics) to evaluate the individual and team learning outcomes, based on such questions as:

  • Did each student fulfill the learning goals they set at the beginning of the project?
  • What did each student learn that they didn’t expect to learn?
  • What kinds of further learning does each student now want to accomplish, given what they learned in the project?
  • What kind of lessons did the entire team learn from the project?


Each person on the team can provide their own answers to these questions and ratings for the evaluating criteria, and the responses can then be shared and discussed among the team members.

Evaluating Project Methods

Students can create a list of criteria (or rubrics) to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management methods used, based on such questions as:

  • How effective was the collaboration among all the team members?
  • How effectively did the team members communicate with each other?
  • How efficient was the project work?
  • How creative was the team in doing the project work?
  • How effective were the project methods used in the Initiating (Defining) phase of the project?
  • How effective were the project methods used in the Planning phase of the project?
  • How effective were the project methods used in the Executing (Doing) phase of the project?
  • How effective were the methods used in this Closing (Reviewing) phase of the project?
  • What would each student do to improve the project processes in each cycle phase of the project?


Each person on the team can provide their own answers to these questions and ratings for the evaluating criteria, and the responses can then be shared and discussed among the team members.

Presenting & Celebrating

Each project team can present the results of their project work to a public audience at a special event such as a project exhibition, a project fair, etc. To prepare for the presentations each team can:

  • Decide who will introduce and present each part of their project
  • Make sure that the presentations cover all four of the project cycle phases, plus the project results, learning outcomes, and project processes used
  • Prepare their presentation slides with a common project template
  • Practice giving their presentation to other students and adults, incorporating their feedback
  • Do a dress rehearsal of the entire presentation, making adjustments as needed


Provide opportunities at the presentation event for audience members and specially invited experts on the topics of the students’ projects to give praise and helpful commentary on the student work, plus time to celebrate the hard work the students did to achieve their project results!

Project Reflections

Each person on the project team can add their reflections on the entire project to their Personal Project Journal, responding to such questions as:

  • What was the most motivating and fun part of the project?
  • What was the most difficult challenge in the project?
  • Do you think the project results met your expectations?
  • What were the biggest lessons learned in the project?
  • Did you achieve all the learning goals you set for yourself?
  • If you could do the project over again, what would you do differently?

Research & Resources

Supporting Rationale and Research

Evaluating the project results and impact, the individual and team learning, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the project processes are important to consolidating the lessons learned and for setting new goals for improved project results and learning outcomes on the next project. Presenting project results to an audience provides further opportunities for developing public speaking skills, and celebrating and reflecting on the project results provides motivation for further learning through effective project methods.

  • Project Management Institute Educational Foundation. “Foundational Guide – Project Management for Learning.” pmief.org., PMIEF, 27 May 2014. Web. 15 Oct. 2015
    http://bit.ly/1QhP6j3
  • Heagney, Joseph. Fundamentals of Project Management. Fourth ed. New York: AMACOM, 2011. Print.
    http://amzn.to/1T4RYmS

Resources

Submission Requirements

Submission Guidelines & Evaluation Criteria

Following are the items to submit and the criteria by which they will be evaluated. In each category an applicant can earn 3, 2 or 1 points. To earn a micro-credential an applicant must earn at least 17 points and cannot receive a score of 1 in more than one category (see scoring rubric below).

Part 1. Educator Overview questions

(200-word limit for each response)

  • Activity Description: What kind of project activities did you and your students engage in to become more proficient in applying the project reviewing and closing strategies to improve learning and project success? Please describe the learning activities and strategies you used.
  • Activity Evaluation: How do you know your students increased their proficiency by engaging in the Closing a Learning Project activities, and what evidence did you collect that demonstrates these learning gains?

Part 2. Student Work Examples/Artifacts

Please submit examples of student work from two students (writing, audio, images, video, etc.) that demonstrate progress toward the Closing a Learning Project competency.

Part 3. Student reflections

(200-word limit for each response)

For the two students whose work examples were included above, submit their student-created reflections on the Closing a Learning Project activities they experienced. Use the following questions as guidance:

  • How did the reviewing and closing project cycle activities and the evaluation criteria and reflections help you better understand how to be an effective project team member and enable your team to produce better project results on the next project?
  • How did the project review strategies change your views on how projects work and how you can use projects to motivate your learning in the future?

Part 4. Educator reflection

(200-word limit for each response)

Provide a reflection on what you learned, using the following questions as guidance:

  • What was the impact of engaging your students in the Closing a Learning Project activities?
  • How will experiencing these project activities shape your daily future teaching practice?

Submission Guidelines and Evaluation criteria scoring rubric

This scoring rubric reflects each of the submission guidelines described above, and passing criteria for each. To see this rubric, please download the full version of the micro-credential.

Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Requirements

Download to access the requirements and scoring guide for this micro-credential.
How to prepare for and earn this micro-credential - in a downloadable PDF document

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