Managing Change

Educator develops a plan that may support other staff members, students, parents, and community members to ensure an effective transition to a new approach to something in his or her school.
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About this Micro-credential

Key Method

Educator creates a change plan that will guide the implementation of a new approach.

Method Components

This demonstration of competency can be tied with the implementation of the plan created by the educator in the “Teacher-powered: Create a Plan” micro-credential, while considering the feedback that was gained in the “Teacher-powered: Engaging Stakeholders” micro-credential.

Educators must create an innovation configuration map that outlines the conditions to be met for successful implementation of the new model.

What is an Innovation Configuration Map?

An innovation configuration map helps teacher leaders successfully plan and communicate a change in program. Educators break down their plan into key components and implementation levels: minimal implementation, some implementation, acceptable implementation, and ideal implementation.

The Innovation Configuration process

  • Provides clear, specific, and shared descriptions of what a new program or practice should look like;
  • Focuses on the key components of a program or practice;
  • Describes variations for each component of a new program in terms of the actions and behaviors that are ideal, acceptable, and unacceptable;
  • Differs from rubrics in that Innovation Configurations describe rather than rate a new practice;
  • Produces flexible documents that can change as the use of a new program or practice matures; and
  • Helps teachers who are new to a school understand program expectations.

The following is an example of a portion of a map focusing on implementing a new teacher induction program: (To see example, please download the requirement doc below)

  • Teachers will create a matrix of data points they plan to collect and the rationale behind why they will collect that particular data. In order to create this matrix of data points, the educator could:
    • Identify key success indicators of full implementation of the new approach. These indicators should be observable actions or behaviors.
    • From the key success indicators of full implementation backwards map phased implementation steps that would lead someone to full implementation. These phased-in steps should also be observable actions or behaviors.

Below are six strategies that can support efforts to effectively implement a new idea or approach. Ideally, all six would be implemented, though for this micro-credential you will only be asked to reflect on three.

  • Strategy 1: Creating a Shared Vision of the Change
    • What strategies have we used to communicate the vision to others?
  • Strategy 2: Planning and Identifying Resources Necessary for the Change
    • What new roles need to be created (or existing ones realigned)?
  • Strategy 3: Investing in Professional Development/Professional Learning
    • How do we design and provide professional learning to meet the needs of the staff throughout the process of implementation?
  • Strategy 4: Checking or Assessing Progress
    • What types of data do we need (evidence of implantation/evidence of impact), and how will we share that data with all stakeholders?
  • Strategy 5: Providing Continuous Assistance
    • How can we maintain the momentum of the implementation as the team faces challenges?
  • Strategy 6: Creating a Context Conducive to Change
    • How do we build a sense of mutual responsibility and accountability for the implementation?

Research & Resources

Supporting Research

This book provides strategies and a research base for how to lead educational change. In an increasingly complex educational landscape, Fullan describes how to lead effectively under messy conditions. Chapters 3, 4, and 6 are particularly helpful for change leadership.

The authors cite evidence and explore possibilities for education if professional capital is increased for teachers and ways for this to happen. Emphasis is placed on the need for teachers’ decisional capital. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 are helpful for leading change.

  • Hargreaves, A., & Fullan, M. (2012). Professional capital: Transforming teaching in every school. Teachers College Press.æ Retrieved from:
    http://bit.ly/1oWo2wi

This study emphasizes the importance of peer sharing for improved student outcomes.

  • Jackson, C. K., & Bruegmann, E. (2009). Teaching students and teaching each other: The importance of peer learning for teachers (No. w15202). National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved from: http://www.nber.org/papers/w15202

Resources

Submission Requirements

Submission Guidelines & Evaluation Criteria

To earn the micro-credential, you must receive a passing evaluation for Parts 1 and 3 and a “Proficient” or higher for each component in Part 2.

Part 1. Overview questions

Activity Description (300-word limit):

  • What project or new approach are you intending to implement?
  • How is the focus of this project going to make a positive change in your school?
  • How will students, community, staff, and/or other stakeholders benefit from this change?

Part 2. Evidence/artifacts

Please submit:

  • An Innovation Configuration map that includes at least three components of the plan and 4 levels of implementation.
  • A matrix of data points you will collect that will show if your plan is effectively meeting the needs of the students and/or teachers.

Part 2. Scoring guide

Your artifact submission will be assessed based on the following rubric. You must earn a “Proficient” or higher score on this portion of the total submission in order to earn the micro-credential.

Part 3. Reflection

Please respond to the following (500-word written reflection or 7–10 minute audio recorded reflection.

As you have crafted and moved toward implementation of this plan, which three of the following strategies have you used to help all stakeholders learn about, implement, refine, and improve the project?

Choose three of the strategies/questions to reflect on your undertaking so far:

  • Strategy 1: Creating a Shared Vision of the Change
    • What strategies have we used to communicate the vision to others?
  • Strategy 2: Planning and Identifying Resources Necessary for the Change
    • What new roles need to be created (or existing ones realigned)?
  • Strategy 3: Investing in Professional Development/Professional Learning
    • How do we design and provide professional learning to meet the needs of the staff throughout the process of implementation?
  • Strategy 4: Checking or Assessing Progress
    • What types of data do we need (evidence of implantation/evidence of impact), and how will we share that data with all stakeholders?
  • Strategy 5: Providing Continuous Assistance
    • How can we maintain the momentum of the implementation as the team faces challenges?
  • Strategy 6: Creating a Context Conducive to Change
    • How do we build a sense of mutual responsibility and accountability for the implementation?
  • How do we build a sense of mutual responsibility and accountability for the implementation?
  • In what ways has this process supported efforts to ensure quality implementation by you and your peers? What successes have you seen and what opportunities for growth exist?

Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Requirements

Download to access the requirements and scoring guide for this micro-credential.
Requirements for Managing Change
How to prepare for and earn this micro-credential - in a downloadable PDF document

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